hack.lu

Introduction to cyberwarfare: theory and practice
10-18, 11:00–11:45 (Europe/Luxembourg), Salle Europe

This talk presents a strict analysis of technology, policy, international law, and cyberwarfare, focusing on the realities of armed conflict in cyberspace. Ukraine and other events in Central Eastern Europe will provide food for thoughts and a case study. The main premise is grounded in sound analysis of rules, strategies, and the mechanics of conflicts.

Some relevant points to consider follow. What’s the relevance to the armed conflict areas? What’s the relevance to the countries non-neutral in a conflict? Should companies prepare in any way, and if so, how? Are there particular risk to IT companies, IT administrators, developers, software engineers, security engineers?


This talk presents a strict analysis of technology, policy, international law, and cyberwarfare, focusing on the realities of armed conflict in cyberspace. Ukraine and other events in Central Eastern Europe will provide food for thoughts and a case study. The main premise is grounded in sound analysis of rules, strategies, and the mechanics of conflicts.

Some relevant points to consider follow. What’s the relevance to the armed conflict areas? What’s the relevance to the countries non-neutral in a conflict? Should companies prepare in any way, and if so, how? Are there particular risk to IT companies, IT administrators, developers, software engineers, security engineers?

Ukraine war highlights the importance of cyberware. Yet, the reality may appear different from prior conceptions or expectations.

Dr Lukasz Olejnik is an independent cybersecurity and privacy researcher and consultant, and a fellow of Geneva Academy of International Humanitarian Law and Human Rights.

He holds a Computer Science PhD at INRIA (France). He worked at CERN (European Organisation for Nuclear Research), and was a research associate at University College London. He was associated with Princeton's Center for Information Technology Policy, with Oxford's Centre for Technology and Global Affairs. Former cyberwarfare advisor at the International Committee of the Red Cross in Geneva, where he worked on the humanitarian consequences of cyber attacks. He authored scientific articles, op-eds, and a book. Former member of the W3C Technical Architecture Group.

His comments appeared in places such as Financial Times, Washington Post, New York Times, Wall Street Journal, Sueddeutsche Zeitung, El Pais, or Le Monde. He authored scientific publications, and opinion articles in venues like Wired or Foreign Policy.